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Access Medicine X: Live Stream Brings Silicon Valley Direct To You

Stanford Medicine X is a catalyst for new ideas, designed to explore social media and information
technology’s power to advance medical practices, improve health, and empower patients to participate in their own care. But Medicine X also seeks to engage and empower those unable to attend in person to still get involved in the discussion.

Through Medicine X’s Global Access program, main stage content from the three-day conference will be made available through a high-quality live stream. Anyone with an Internet connection around the world will be able to view keynote speakers such as Daniel Siegel, MD, clinical professor of psychiatry at University of California-Los Angeles and author of The New York Times bestseller Brainstorm: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain, and panel discussions such as Gonzalo Bacigalupe's focusing on the e-health movement and inequality among marginalized populations.

“Medicine X has distinguished itself through a singular commitment to inclusivity and by finding new ways to bring every voice and perspective into important conversations about health care,” said Lawrence Chu, MD, associate professor of anesthesia at the School of Medicine and the conference’s executive director, according to Stanford's press release.

The Global Access program encourages ePatients, academic scholars and students to participate in the conference virtually. In addition to watching main stage presentations, virtual attendees may engage in real-time discussions with those in attendance at Stanford via Twitter.

In 2013, Medicine X broke all records for the most tweets per day from a health care conference, besting even TEDMED and HIMSS, according to analytics data firm Symplur. More than 3,500 participants engaged with Medicine X via Twitter, making it the most talked about conference of the year with nearly 27,000 tweets in three days.

MedX's reach: Symplur's choropleth map shows
from where tweeters engaged with the conference.

Medicine X also had the highest engagement of U.S.-verified physicians among the four top healthcare conferences and the largest and most diverse program for patient engagement of any leading healthcare conference.

“Medicine X is all about people working together toward changing health care for the better, and everyone is welcome,” said e-patient Hugo Campos, according to Stanford's press release. “Patients are on an equal footing with all other participants, and that’s fundamental for fostering true partnership toward change."

The “X” in Medicine X is meant to evoke a move beyond numbers and trends—it represents the infinite possibilities for current and future information technologies to improve health. For the Global Access program, X also represents what it costs to tune in to the live stream. X is the value virtual attendees get from the experience. X is what it’s worth to be included. X is up to you.

Virtual attendees must register to access the free live stream. At any point during the three-day conference, live stream viewers may choose to contribute in recognition of the content provided. All funds raised support Medicine X’s effort to provide access to the community at large. To view the full schedule and register for the Global Access program, visit medicinex.stanford.edu.

However, the only way to access the expansive content not shared on the Medicine X main stage is to attend in person. The Medicine X Master Class program, a series of small-venue seminars taught by experts in specific disciplines, will feature Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine; Charles Ornstein, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and senior reporter at ProPublica; Wendy Sue Swanson, MD, pediatrician and author of the Seattle Mama Doc blog; Bryan Vartabedian, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics and director of digital literacy at the Baylor College of Medicine; and Roni Zeiger, MD, CEO of Smart Patients.

“As a pediatrician trying to change how we deliver health care, Medicine X is a lens to the future for me,” Swanson said, according to Stanford's press release. “Innovators, developers, nurses, patients and staff come together to improve the architecture of seeking and delivering health care.” It’s a place where the hallway is as exciting as the stage — the networking, the stories and the solutions and partnerships that come out of Medicine X have been transformational for me.”

Medicine X is a project of the Stanford University School of Medicine Anesthesia Informatics and Media Lab, and is sponsored in part by the school’s Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine. Other sponsors are Stanford Hospital & Clinics, the Agency for Healthcare Research Quality, Stanford Hospital Corporate Partners Program, Eli Lilly COI and Boehringer Ingelheim.

Connect with Medicine X on Twitter @StanfordMedX and follow #MedX. Find Medicine X on Facebook at facebook.com/stanfordmedx.


ePatients, learn more about Medicine X's ePatient Scholars Program!
The 2015 application cycle will be announced before year's end. 

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